#Theredheadedauthor Presents the July 2020 New York Times TOP 10 Best Sellers – YOUNG ADULT

As an avid reader of fiction (and an author who one day hopes to make the list) I LOVE-LOVE-LOVE checking out the New York Times Best Seller list. So, here it is… The independently ranked top 10 Young Adult selections for July 2020!

If you’ve read any of the TOP 10 selections and recommend them, please comment below and let me know. If you see something you like and plan to pick up a copy, you can do so by clicking on the cover image, the title or the [BUY IT HERE] button.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


#1 Stamped

by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

An exploration of racism and anti-racism in America.


#2 The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

A 16-year-old girl sees a police officer kill her friend.


#3 I’m Not Dying With You Tonight

by Kimberly Jones and Gilly Segal

Two girls, one black and one white, form a bond during a racially charged riot.


#4 One of Us is Lying

by Karen M. McManus

For five students, a detour into detention ends in murder.


#5 Children of Blood and Bone

by Tomi Adeyemi

Zelie fights to restore magic to the land of Orisha.



#6 Clap When You Land

by Elizabeth Acevedo

Unbeknownst to each other, two sisters meet when their father dies in a plane crash.


#7 Chain of Gold

by Cassandra Clare

Cordelia battles demons in a quarantined London that are nothing like she’s encountered before.


#8 The Betrothed

by Kiera Cass

Lady Hollis Brite and King Jameson are set to be married, but will a commoner steal Hollis’s heart?


#9 Children of Virtue and Vengeance

by Tomi Adeyemi

Zelie must stop the threat of civil war in Orisha.


#10 One of Us is Next

by Karen M. McManus

In this sequel to “One of Us is Lying,” a deadly game of truth or dare via text now plagues the students of Bayview High.


When you purchase a book using a link on this site, I earn an affiliate commission. All commission earnings go back into funding my books; editing, cover design, etc.


#Theredheadedauthor Presents the July 2020 New York Times TOP 10 Best Sellers – FICTION

As an avid reader of fiction (and an author who one day hopes to make the list) I LOVE-LOVE-LOVE checking out the New York Times Best Seller list. So, here it is… The independently ranked top 10 Fiction selections for July 2020!

If you’ve read any of the TOP 10 selections and recommend them, please comment below and let me know. If you see something you like and plan to pick up a copy, you can do so by clicking on the cover image, the title or the [BUY IT HERE] button.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.


#1 28 Summers

by Elin Hilderbrand

A relations hip that started in 1993 between Mallory Blessing and Jake McCloud comes to light while she is on her deathbed and his wife runs for president.


#2 The Vanishing Half

by Brit Bennett

The lives of twin sisters who run away from a Southern Black community at age 16 diverge as one returns and the other takes on a different racial identity but their fates intertwine.


#3 Where The Crawdads Sing

by Delia Owens

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.


#4 The Guardians

by John Grisham

Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.


#5 Camino Winds

by John Grisham

The line between fact and fiction becomes blurred when an author of thrillers is found dead after a hurricane hits Camino Island.


#6 Walk the Wire

by David Baldacci

The sixth book in the Memory Man series. Decker and Jamison investigate a murder in a North Dakota town in a fracking boom.


#7 The Summer House

by James Patterson and Brendan DuBois

Jeremiah Cook, a veteran and former N.Y.P.D. cop, investigates a mass murder near a lake in Georgia.


#8 The Guest List

by Lucy Foley

A wedding between a TV star and a magazine publisher on an island off the coast of Ireland turns deadly.


#9 Little Fires Everywhere

by Celeste Ng

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.


#10 The Last Flight

by Julie Clark

Claire Cook escapes from living with her quick-tempered husband and assumes another woman’s identity.


When you purchase a book using a link on this site, I earn an affiliate commission. All commission earnings go back into funding my books; editing, cover design, etc.


Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 6

Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode
A #TheRedheadedAuthor Production

INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE:

Goldfish by Haley Loveday (Read by Carrie Smithson)
Little Girl by Tanja Miller (Read by Nina Soden)
Awake by Chloe Long (Read by Robbie Shafer)
The Yarn of the Nancy Bell by William S. Gilbert (Read by John Miller)

FOLLOW ME VIRTUALLY:

YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/ninasoden
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Nina-Soden/e/B00ITHSXC8/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1
Website: www.ninasoden.com
Twitter: @Nina_Soden
Instagram: Nina_Soden
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodangelseries


Check out the previous Episodes below:

Episode 1 – https://youtu.be/sXKHUqvC9Vc
Episode 2 – https://youtu.be/0EBR7Pi1XqM
Episode 3 – https://youtu.be/XKM01RGiXls
Episode 4 – https://youtu.be/Y2yW2Tg3HaQ
Episode 5 – https://youtu.be/XJjIUMaK_PE


Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 4

Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode
A #TheRedheadedAuthor Production

INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE:

Pieces by Amanda Porter ~ Read by Molly Knicks
Sleep by Chloe Long ~ Read by Nina Soden
Did Anyone… by Nina Soden ~ Read by Stephanie Jones
Margaret Fuller Slack by Edgar Lee Masters ~ Read by Cam Gaylord Scales
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Lee Frost ~ Read by Mel White

FOLLOW ME VIRTUALLY:

YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/ninasoden
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Nina-Soden/e/B00ITHSXC8/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1
Website: www.ninasoden.com
Twitter: @Nina_Soden
Instagram: Nina_Soden
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodangelseries


Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 3

Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode
A #TheRedheadedAuthor Production

INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE:

Everybody Take A Knee by Jason M. Summer ~ Read by David Schulte

Nations by Amanda Porter ~ Read by Art Walthall

Tin Soldiers by Stacy Kingsley ~ Read by Michelle Huguley

Is It Wrong To Be Black? by Faith Monique ~ Read by Faith Monique

FOLLOW ME VIRTUALLY:

YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/ninasoden
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Nina-Soden/e/B00ITHSXC8/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1
Website: www.ninasoden.com
Twitter: @Nina_Soden
Instagram: Nina_Soden
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodangelseries


Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 2

Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 2
A #TheRedheadedAuthor Production

INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE:

Forgiven by Amanda Porter ~ Read by Kelly Hutchings

Mirror Image by Nina Soden ~ Read by Valerie Clemons

Kin by Chloe Long ~ Read by Savannah Rutherford

A Dream by Edgar Allan Poe ~ Read by George Kobler

FOLLOW ME VIRTUALLY:

YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/ninasoden
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Nina-Soden/e/B00ITHSXC8/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1
Website: www.ninasoden.com
Twitter: @Nina_Soden
Instagram: Nina_Soden
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodangelseries


Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 1

Virtual Poetry Reading – Episode 1
A #TheRedheadedAuthor Production

INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE:

The Story of Alice by Amanda Porter ~ Read by Tanja Miller

Desperately Falling by Nina Soden ~ Read by Jacinda Rose Swinehart-Johnson

How I Let Myself be Happy in 3 Steps by Chloe Long ~ Read by Megan Tompkins

What Was by Jason M. Summer ~ Read by Michael Anders

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe ~ Read by John Miller

FOLLOW ME VIRTUALLY:

YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/ninasoden
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Nina-Soden/e/B00ITHSXC8/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1
Website: www.ninasoden.com
Twitter: @Nina_Soden
Instagram: Nina_Soden
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bloodangelseries


The Time Is Write: How Making Time to Write Each Day Helps Keep Me Grounded

The Time Is Write: How Making Time to Write Each Day Helps Keep Me Grounded (Guest post by Desiree Villena)

Lately, time seems to have lost all its usual meaning. When everything is done at home, the divide between work and leisure becomes hazy — one long, delirious blur without our typical routines to divide the days. This can make it hard to maintain momentum in your writing, especially when you feel a million competing voices in your head telling you all the things you should be doing: working harder, spending time with family, reading more, sleeping more…

I, too, often struggle with how to balance my creative projects with personal and professional demands. But though structure may have vanished, there’s still the same number of hours in a day. I’ve found that carving out dedicated writing time, even if it’s just a little bit every day, helps me regain a sense of meaning — I can’t control what goes on in the world outside, but I can control what happens in my stories.

Whether you’re writing a book that you hope to publish soon or crafting tales purely for your own enjoyment, writing for even a small portion of each day can do wonders for your artistic and emotional health. Here, I outline my approach to balancing writing with my other commitments, and delve into how working on my stories keeps me from feeling overwhelmed in the chaos.

Making use of small moments

Maybe you’ve already got a consistent writing schedule that keeps you on track — but for most of us, that’s a hard thing to establish! Building a reliable writing routine has been something that plagues even the most dedicated of authors. Personally, I’ve never quite been able to commit to a strict writing routine. While sometimes I wish I could make myself write at the same time every day or hit concrete targets, life is too unpredictable, and I’ve come to realize different writing tips work for different people!

Especially when you have a full-time job, a family, or other obligations that require your time and mental energy, dedicating hours of each day simply to write can feel like an unrealistic luxury. So my philosophy is to allow myself flexibility to write when I can, taking advantage of small pockets of time. Morning runs can occasionally serve as great brainstorming sessions, and gaps between meetings can be a great time to start outlining my next chapter. I even find myself jotting down ideas while watching TV or doing chores — inspiration can strike at strange times.

Writing does not have to be a 9-to-5 job or a non-stop marathon. Everyone writes at their own pace, and little chunks of time can quickly add up to great progress. Breaking up your day with short bursts of creativity can also help replenish your energy, giving you something to look forward to throughout the day.

Keeping my vision in sight

Dedicating at least small bits of each day to writing also gives me a sense of purpose as an author. Every day, I’m asking myself to treat writing seriously, and reminding myself why I write in the first place: while it can be challenging, especially when I’m struggling with a difficult passage or trying to edit, it is also an immense joy to bring characters to life on the page.

Keeping in mind my larger vision for each project also gives me something concrete to work toward — thinking about what this short story might look like when it’s complete, or where this character arc goes. Imagining my future readers once my work is published also helps give me a sense of purpose as I try to write stories that resonate. I ask myself questions like How would I describe this book? Why does it matter to me? Keeping sight of what I’m trying to write and why I’m writing serves as a potent reminder of why my work matters, even in confusing times.

Turning each day into a non-zero day

My philosophy of writing is dedicated to the idea of the “non-zero day”: doing something each and every day to advance toward my goal, even if it’s a tiny step forward. Progress is progress, no matter how insignificant it may seem. Sometimes it can feel overwhelming to tackle a challenge like “finish a story” or “edit a draft” — setting small, achievable, goals is a great way to keep myself motivated.

I aim to do a little something every day to stay grounded in my writing habits. Even if I’m not adding a single sentence to my work in progress, I can find other ways to still develop my craft: doing research, sketching out character backstory, or reading other books for inspiration. If you’re stuck on a book you’re writing, you might spend time looking at comparable titles, thinking about how’ll market your finished work to your audience, or developing your author website — granting each day a sense of purpose.

Giving myself freedom to explore

Even with all my strategies for maintaining inspiration, writer’s block inevitably hits sometimes. When this happens, I often find it helpful to allow myself to use “imperfect words” and freewrite without filtering.

The goal of freewriting is to write unhindered by self-consciousness or the expectation that a story has to be immediately polished. I go wherever my mind takes me. That means, if I feel inspired to take a total detour from my current project by starting a story in a new genre or embodying a silly new character, I let myself go for it! Sometimes using a creative writing prompt or taking part in a writing challenge also helps me regain that spark of imagination.

I never want to lose sight of the passion that urges me to write in the first place. That’s why my approach to my writing is to make it a funhabit — like a daily treat, not a job or chore. When I feel overwhelmed by what today might hold or wonder what tomorrow might look like, writing grounds me in the present moment — harnessing the emotion and noise of the world and making today count.

Lately I have been especially grateful for each sentence I put on the page. Even as we lose our sense of time, we do not lose our sense of purpose: words have immense power, and will always make themselves heard.

Desiree Villena is a writer with Reedsy, a marketplace that connects authors with the world’s best publishing resources. In her spare time, Desiree enjoys reading contemporary fiction and writing short stories — and occasionally giving writerly advice! She looks forward to writing in coffee shops and libraries again soon.


Mary Jane Kelly ~ Victim of Jack the Ripper Speaks

Virtual Theatre Performance from The Belles of Whitechapel ~ The Victims of Jack the Ripper Speak, written by Wayne Miller / Directed by Nina Soden

Actress/Director Nina Soden

I am excited to be bringing Mary Jane Kelly back to life, even if just for a few minutes, to tell her story. I am truly thankful to Wayne Miller, playwriter and co-owner of Evil Cheez Productions, for the beautiful words and the gracious permission to produce and direct this wonderful show. I am proud to have been able to work with such a wonderful cast and excited to be able to still bring theatre to an audience, even when so many theatres across the globe are still shut down due to COVID-19. Art is essential and will find ways, such as virtual theatre, to survive. Thank you, to all of you, for taking the time to watch this show.

When asked her thoughts on Mary Jane Kelly’s monologue, Nina had this to say: Her words, the way Wayne wrote her, is devastating. She had such hope in life. She had love, loss, joy, pain, determination, and below it all a deep sadness. I had the honor of playing her during the premier performance of The Belles of Whitechapel at The Lowery House many years ago when Wayne Miller directed it. Reconnecting with her has been like putting on a warm coat or slipping into my favorite pajamas; it is easy to slip into her skin and feel all of her emotions. Maybe its because of how well she is written, or maybe it is because on some level I think every woman can relate to her.

When asked about the process of performing virtual theatre, she said: Of course live theatre is always best with an audience. However, in this crazy pandemic life we are living in right now, I believe it is still important to be creating art in any way we can. Besides, as an actress, film has always been my passion, so being in front of a camera is completely natural for me. I love it! Being able to share Mary Jane Kelly with a broader audience is the icing on the cake. When it comes to stage vs. camera, I prepare for a role the same way. Memorization is memorization, and the lines come easy to me – they always have. I enjoy the character development process, I think that is why it is so easy to slip into a role and learn the lines. As a director, this process was a little harder. We conducted ZOOM rehearsals to ensure proper social distancing and did all of our communicating through Facebook. It wasn’t as easy as meeting face to face, but it worked. With just 2 short weeks to complete the project, I think everyone did a wonderful job.


A Note from the Director

As a writer, I can appreciate every word Wayne put into this script. His research and dedication to his writing did these women proud. As an actress, I hope to one day play all the roles so I can truly connect with each of them on an emotional level. As a director, I am both honored and humbled that Wayne would trust me with this production. I have loved working with each of these actresses and believe that in the short time we had together (2 weeks start to finish) each and every one of them have given a beautiful performance. ~ Nina Soden


WAYNE MILLER is the owner and creative director of EVIL CHEEZ PRODUCTIONS and is the Grand High Poobah of CHEEZISM, the movement he founded (it isn’t organized enough to be called a religion, besides which it isn’t religious) dedicated to providing audiences with the finest in entertainment options on the page and for the stage. (On the big screen, too, if Spielberg ever returns any of his phone calls.) Wayne has been writing stories literally since before he learned his alphabet—he drew pictures. After languishing in the nether-regions of the publishing industry for years, working as an acquisitions editor for a literary agency, he chose, as an experiment, to combine his passion for writing with his hobby of Theatre, and in the process, by accident and Providence, discovered his life’s purpose: to be a showman.

Describing himself as a cross between Edgar Allan Poe and P.T. Barnum, Miller is a devotee of Ed Wood, the “worst director of all time!” who inspires Wayne due to his unflappable dedication to his muse and unrestrainable creative drive.

When not involved in Cheez business, Wayne Miller is a reporter for the websites werewolves.com, vampires.com, and darkness.com. He has previously written content for zombies.org, topcomics.com, thenerdrecites.com, and Legless Corpse Films.


SPECIAL THANKS:

Wayne Miller and Tanya Miller of Evil Cheez Productions for allowing me the honor of producing and directing this amazing play. Through his script, Wayne has done a wonderful job of bringing these women back to life, even if just for a few minutes, to tell their story. Make sure you check out Evil Cheez online and learn about their upcoming productions.

Theatre Huntsville for letting us use The Studio Theatre space at Lowe Mill and for providing the professional lighting design. You can find them, and their upcoming productions, online by clicking HERE or on Facebook.


Please like, share, subscribe, and comment so more people can share in this virtual theatre experience.  


To read the actresses comments about their characters, click on the links below and you’ll be taken to the individual posts!

Annie Millwood
Martha Tabram
Polly Nichols
“Dark Annie” Chapman
Elizabeth “Long Liz” Stride and Kate Eddowes
Sarah Lewis
Mary Jane Kelly

Sarah Lewis ~ Victim of Jack the Ripper Speaks

Virtual Theatre Performance from The Belles of Whitechapel ~ The Victims of Jack the Ripper Speak, written by Wayne Miller / Directed by Nina Soden

Actress Haley Loveday

Haley Loveday has been in love with acting since 2010 when she auditioned for her very first play, Noises Off. Since then, she has had the honor of bringing roles such as Blanche DuBois in Streetcar Named Desire, Pickles in The Great American Trailerpark Musical, Evelyn Thompson in The Shape of Things, and most recently, Meg MaGrath in Crimes of the Heart, to life. She has also done some work in film and television. Haley lives in Huntsville with her wife and daughter and their 3 dogs, Bubsy, Pip, and Lucy. She loves to write, travel, and drink wine. She would like to thank Nina Soden for trusting her with this role and Wayne Miller for breathing life into The Belles of Whitechapel. 

When asked her thoughts on Sarah Lewis’s monologue, Haley had this to say: Sarah Lewis is very different from my own character in that I found her to be very judgemental of the “unfortunates” and almost victim shaming when it came to their circumstances. I think she has layers of sympathy and humility, but it is often times over-shadowed by her piety. She is terrified when she realizes that she could have been just like the women that she looks down upon, no matter that she is an honest woman herself. I believe that she might have a history of prostitution or degeneracy, which was probably brought on by poverty in the past, but now that she is married and out of “the life” the idea that she could have potentially been mistaken for one of “those women” again might be worse to her than the fact that she met Jack the Ripper.

When asked about the process of performing virtual theatre, she said: The process of learning a monologue as long and as layered as this one in only 2 weeks, with a 1 year old running around, was really survival of the fittest. My wife was a big help in giving me an hour or two here and there to really dive in and razor focus. I would have liked more time to work through the piece, but having such a short time to learn it forced me to challenge myself and pushed me to jump in with both feet right away.

I enjoy monologues because they give you the opportunity to find levels in your work. There is a real peace in knowing that you have ultimate control over what you bring to the script and how it is presented. I also like the pressure of only having myself to rely on on stage or in this case, on film. I do prefer scene work and being on stage with a live audience over monologues and film, simply because having the response of the audience adds to the over all experience and energy of the experience each night. There is nothing quite like treading the boards under bright stage lights. 


A Note from the Director

As a writer, I can appreciate every word Wayne put into this script. His research and dedication to his writing did these women proud. As an actress, I hope to one day play all the roles so I can truly connect with each of them on an emotional level. As a director, I am both honored and humbled that Wayne would trust me with this production. I have loved working with each of these actresses and believe that in the short time we had together (2 weeks start to finish) each and every one of them have given a beautiful performance. ~ Nina Soden


WAYNE MILLER is the owner and creative director of EVIL CHEEZ PRODUCTIONS and is the Grand High Poobah of CHEEZISM, the movement he founded (it isn’t organized enough to be called a religion, besides which it isn’t religious) dedicated to providing audiences with the finest in entertainment options on the page and for the stage. (On the big screen, too, if Spielberg ever returns any of his phone calls.) Wayne has been writing stories literally since before he learned his alphabet—he drew pictures. After languishing in the nether-regions of the publishing industry for years, working as an acquisitions editor for a literary agency, he chose, as an experiment, to combine his passion for writing with his hobby of Theatre, and in the process, by accident and Providence, discovered his life’s purpose: to be a showman.

Describing himself as a cross between Edgar Allan Poe and P.T. Barnum, Miller is a devotee of Ed Wood, the “worst director of all time!” who inspires Wayne due to his unflappable dedication to his muse and unrestrainable creative drive.

When not involved in Cheez business, Wayne Miller is a reporter for the websites werewolves.com, vampires.com, and darkness.com. He has previously written content for zombies.org, topcomics.com, thenerdrecites.com, and Legless Corpse Films.


SPECIAL THANKS:

Wayne Miller and Tanya Miller of Evil Cheez Productions for allowing me the honor of producing and directing this amazing play. Through his script, Wayne has done a wonderful job of bringing these women back to life, even if just for a few minutes, to tell their story. Make sure you check out Evil Cheez online and learn about their upcoming productions.

Theatre Huntsville for letting us use The Studio Theatre space at Lowe Mill and for providing the professional lighting design. You can find them, and their upcoming productions, online by clicking HERE or on Facebook.


Please like, share, subscribe, and comment so more people can share in this virtual theatre experience.


To read the actresses comments about their characters, click on the links below and you’ll be taken to the individual posts!

Annie Millwood
Martha Tabram
Polly Nichols
“Dark Annie” Chapman
Elizabeth “Long Liz” Stride and Kate Eddowes
Sarah Lewis
Mary Jane Kelly